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June 19, 2018

Whole House Fans And The Truth Behind Their Cost

Frugality has become a necessity in today’s world of skyrocketing prices and stagnant pay. This necessity has made one single factor more important than the rest by a large margin when considering buying something, the cost.

The cost of something has now become a dealbreaker. Sometimes, even the perceived cost of something can cause someone to completely rule out a purchase. This often happens with large purchases for the home. People know that the immediate cost will leave a large dent in their bank account so they do not even consider buying something they deem unnecessary and expensive.

Whole house fans are actually not as expensive as their initial cost may suggest. That robust cost, from a company such Quiet Cool, can be anywhere from $600 to $1,200 for the product alone. Plus the installation which could take someone back another couple hundred dollars.

So, at the end of the day, for the most expensive version of a whole house fan most people are looking at around $1,500. This seems like a lot and is probably what puts many off to actually purchasing whole house fans but what many do not know is how much money whole house fans can save on electricity.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E) claims that whole house fans use up to 90% less energy than compressor based air conditioners. During the Summer months air conditioning can cost up to $300 a month from June to August. Saving up to 90% would mean someone can recuperate the money they spent on a whole house fan in nearly those three months alone as you would save around $800.

This leaves nine other months, some of which are just as hot, to regain the money you spent. This could be easily accomplished in just five to six months and from then on your new cooling system could actually be saving you lots of money.

Cost is important and it is obvious that large purchases are tough to finally commit to but buying a whole house fan is an important investment, especially for people who live in areas that get annoyingly hot throughout the year. These systems could actually end up saving many lots of money throughout the years instead of costing them.

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